Sujit Choudhry Is A Renowned Scholar Of Comparative Law

Comparative law is the study of the various legal systems used in different countries. The main objective of this branch of law is to establish the similarities and differences that exist in the multiple legal systems. It seeks to compare the legal approaches used in different countries. The most common legal systems in the world include Civil law, Islamic law, Common law, Chinese law, Jewish law, Hindu law, and Canon law. Economic globalization, democratization, and internationalism have resulted in the increased value of comparative law today.

Comparative law is different from general jurisprudence and international law. However, despite the differences, comparative law plays a pivotal role in informing all the other areas of normativity. It contributes to legal theory by establishing categories and concepts of general application. A number of disciplines have developed as separate units of comparative law. They include comparative administrative law, comparative constitutional law, and comparative civil law. The others are comparative commercial law and comparative criminal law. Comparative law helps to advance the legal systems in effect and aid individuals to have a deeper comprehension of the legal systems. It also contributes to the unification of different legal systems. One of the greatest scholars of comparative law is Sujit Choudhry.

About Sujit Choudhry

Sujit Choudhry is a globally respected authority in the field of comparative constitutional law. Sujit is the I. Michael Heyman Professor of Law. In order to succeed in the field, he has always combined a wide-ranging research agenda with his field experience as an adviser. He has gained immense knowledge in the constitution building processes in many countries, including Libya, Egypt, South Africa, Tunisia, Jordan, Ukraine, Sri Lanka, and Nepal. His research addresses a wide range of topics regarding comparative constitutional law. They include constitutional design as an important instrument of managing transition from conflict to democratic politics. His research also addresses constitutional design in societies that are ethnically divided, constitutional courts, and official language policy. Additionally, his hypothesis seeks to address the bills of right, proportionality and minority group rights.

Sujit has published over 90 articles, reports, working papers, and book chapters. He is the founding director of the Center for Constitutional Transitions, which mobilizes and generates knowledge in aid of constitution building. The institution assembles and leads worldwide networks of professionals to finish thematic research projects, which provide policy options to practitioners. Before joining Berkeley, Sujit worked for the NYU School of Law as the Cecelia Goetz Professor of Law.

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